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laughingsquid:

Three Banded Armadillo Rolls Around on the Floor with His Favorite Pink Toy

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shelleyhenign:

How do we get him out to the lake house if he doesn’t trust us?

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sosuperawesome:

Paper art by Elsa Mora aka elsita on Etsy

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sosuperawesome:

Jewelry by jerseymaids

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whybanshee:

BEST SCENE OF THE EPISODE

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thefrogman:

Tig Notaro [video]

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allons-y-to-the-stars:

voldesnorts:

trip-iphany:

quiet-desperati0n:

I am a feminist because
I don’t think this video could be much more relevant.

YASS

everyone should see this

So you definitely need to watch the video that goes with this

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unlockaflockofwords:

Always reblog The Princess Bride

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comedycentral:

The Texas GOP has officially endorsed reparative gay therapy. Click here for more from The Daily Show.

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sagansense:

This guy.

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skunkbear:

This just in: spiders tune the silk threads of their webs like guitar strings

… and they use the distinct vibrational frequencies to help them locate meals and mates. Hear the full story of these good vibrations, from NPR’s Christopher Joyce, here

And watch our video!:

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theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

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smartgirlsattheparty:

newyorker:

In memory of Maya Angelou, who died today at the age of 86, a look at a slide show of her life in photographs: http://nyr.kr/1pylkYU

Angelou, date unknown. Photograph by Chester Higgins Jr./Getty.

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