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mentalflossr:

7 Stunning Mineral Formations

The world is made up of wondrous chemicals that sometimes do pretty out-of-the-ordinary things. Here are seven places where minerals, carried by water, by heat, or by the actions of Mother Earth herself, left us with strange and wonderful sights.

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bibliolectors:

Always reading / Siempre leyendo (ilustración de Lucía Serrano)

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owlturdcomix:

One more month.

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You might find it hard to imagine gravity as a weak force, but consider that a small magnet, can hold up a paper clip, even though the entire earth is pulling down on it.

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beamspams:

Best quotes » The Princess Bride

Narrowing it down to just 10 lines was the hardest part. One of the most quotable movies of all time.

Bonus round:

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adventuresonpaper:

I’ll come back for you i whisper as i caress the books i can’t afford

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And I think that there is nothing wrong with loving what you love; I do think it’s important to be able to critique problematic narratives, or stories that are pushing forward flawed representations (of gender, of race, of sexuality, of size or ability, etc.), and to be open to critique of your own work and of work that you enjoy — but at the same time I’m uncomfortable with a lot of the disdain for certain elements of commercial fiction and, especially, commercial YA. Certain conventions get employed so often because a lot of people want to read them, primarily women, and a blanket contempt for “cliche” more often than not looks to me like a blanket contempt for stories produced and consumed by women. That, to me, is often more problematic than the individual narratives themselves. You’d have a hard time convincing me that that kind of scrutiny and dismissal doesn’t get applied much more intensely to female writers and female readers than male writers and male readers.
And honestly, I’m not sure that those conventions are so much a problem — I think it’s doing teenagers (and especially teenage girls, who bear the brunt of our cultural concern-trolling) a pretty big disservice to suggest that, for example, reading Twilight is going to turn them all into brain-dead girl-zombies in abusive relationships (I grew up obsessed with Flowers in the Attic, which makes Twilight look like the S.C.U.M. Manifesto, and I turned out pretty okay). If we want girls to be growing up self-reliant and making good decisions, that’s our job as a culture, not my job (or Stephenie Meyer’s job, or anybody’s job) as a writer.
I do think it’s a huge problem that publishers put so much weight and so much money behind the same kinds of stories — heteronormative romances starring white kids, written by white authors — but I think that’s a totally different conversation.

This interview with author Sarah McCarry is really great, particularly what she has to say about YA cliches.  (via catagator)
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tyleroakley:

unimportant:

sorrowdecrease:

3-amsecrets:

this is my favorite thing tyra banks has ever said

this is important

i fucking love tyra

SLAY.

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Because it would be interesting… if all your life you remembered that your first kiss happened… when you thought you looked weird, wouldn’t it? Because then you’d know. It’s not what you look like on the outside that matters. It’s what kind of a person you are.

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kokodokoko:

why always the love triangle why never the threesome

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workaholics:

It’s Friday. Who’s gettin’ weird this weekend?

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asapscience:

Aganetha Dyck has been an artist working for years with a strange medium: honeycomb. 

Interested in inter-species communication, Dyck allows bees to compose honeycomb alongside her works, creating beautiful, organic objects. 

via Colossal